Solving the IP problem, one rupee at a time

One valid argument against GMOs is that big corporations control the tech and can charge the farmers sky high prices for the seed. For a long time, I’ve been saying that I don’t like the system, but if countries want to protect their farmers then they should pass some legislation. Well, it’s happened!

The Maharashtra government has fixed the price of genetically modified Bt cotton seeds at 750 rupees [about US $17.40] for a 450 gram [about 1 pound] packet, it said on Wednesday.

This is the maximum price that seed companies can charge from farmers in the current sowing season, which will start from [sic.] June.

Other main cotton growing states like Andhra Pradesh in eastern coast and Gujarat in western coast have already imposed similar price restrictions.

Maharashtra, the biggest cultivator of the fibre crop, this year began fixing seed prices ahead of the sowing operations in the upcoming kharif season [autumn harvest], under a new government act.

via CheckBiotech

Written by Anastasia Bodnar

Anastasia Bodnar is a science communicator and science policy expert with a PhD in plant genetics and sustainable agriculture from Iowa State University. Anastasia has had various risk analysis roles in US government and military service. She serves as BFI's Director of Policy and as Co-Executive Editor of the Biofortified Blog.

One comment

  1. The various issues that GE crops bring up are often just lumped together as some sort of impassible massive heap of trouble. Good find on a creative solution to the worry over seed prices!

    I just wish people wouldn’t use political and economic issues to try to convince people that GE crops are scientifically vacuous or questionable.

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